Tag Archives: HCV/HIV coinfection

CROI 2017 by Lucinda K. Porter, RN

CROI 2017 by Lucinda K. Porter, RNLucinda K. Porter

This is a collection of blog posts written by Lucinda K. Porter, RN, a hepatitis C writer who attended this year’s Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI). The blog posts below highlight hepatitis C studies presented at the conference that stood out to her.

Please scroll down and click on the blog tittles that interest you.

Sampling of CROI 2017 Meeting Highlights Written by Lucinda K. Porter, RN

CROI 2017

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), an annual preeminent HIV research meeting, was held in Seattle, Washington, February 13-16 this year. CROI gathers scientists researching epidemiology and biology of human retroviruses and associated diseases to discuss their findings.

More information about the CROI and the studies that were presented there can also be found in our blog post CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part I.

“Creating a world free from hepatitis C one step at a time” -Lucinda Porter

CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part II

CROI 2017 Hep C (HCV) HighlightsCROI 2017

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), an annual preeminent HIV research meeting, was held in Seattle, Washington, February 13-16 this year. CROI gathers scientists researching epidemiology and biology of human retroviruses and associated diseases to discuss their findings.

This blog post is a collection of HIV/HCV highlights that were presented at CROI 2017. Please scroll down and click on the subjects that interest you.

More Interesting CROI 2017 Abstracts about HIV/HCV Coinfection

More information about The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), or these and other studies can be found in our blog post CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part I or on the conference’s website.

CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part I

CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part ICROI 2017

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), an annual preeminent HIV research meeting, was held in Seattle, Washington, February 13-16 this year. CROI gathers scientists researching epidemiology and biology of human retroviruses and associated diseases to discuss their findings.

This blog post is a collection of HIV/HCV highlights that were presented. Please scroll down and click on the subjects that interest you.

Interesting Meeting Abstracts about HIV/HCV Coinfection

More information about The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), or these and other studies can be found in our blog post CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part II or on the conference’s website.

HCV / HIV Co-Infection Topics Presented at #EASLsp

HCV / HIV Co-Infection Topics Presented at #EASLspThe European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) / American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)’s two day special conference, entitled “New Perspectives in Hepatitis C Virus Infection – The Roadmap for Cure” (#EASLsp), was held last week in Paris, France. The conference has gathered experts to review and analysis current hepatitis C (HCV) treatment data, published and unpublished. This blog covers just some of what was presented about HCV/HIV co-infection.

Some HCV / HIV Co-Infection Topics Presented in Paris

The links below may need to be clicked twice or waited for in order to work.

Summary: Due to the complex way liver disease develops, the higher risk of hep C and re-infection, and the risk for drug interactions with antiretrovirals, frequently not addressed in clinical trials, those with HCV/HIV co-infection still pose challenges.

Summary: HCV/HIV co-infection is prevalent in those who use opiates. However, little is known about the results of opiate replacement treatment (ORT) for those with hep C and those who are HCV/HIV co-infected who are in ORT. This study saw that HCV/HIV co-infected patients received more methadone when compared with patients without infections. No differences in methadone doses were found in those with hep C. It also showed that hep C doesn’t cause any difference in whether or not the opiate replacement treatment (ORT) will work long term.

Summary: This study looked at the effectiveness of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), a type of hep C treatment, in real life. It looked at interactions between HCV/HIV treatments and monitored liver fibrosis, transaminases, and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) changes while taking treatment. The study found that direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are effective and improve liver fibrosis, hepatic cytolysis, and AFP.

For more information about studies presented at the EASL / AASLD special conference in Paris last week, please find Part I of the conference’s blog series here and Part II here.

HCV and HIV Co-Infection – Transmission to Treatment Forum

HCV and HIV Co-Infection - Transmission to Treatment Forum2016 World Hepatitis Day is fast approaching. On July 28th, it will be celebrated and acknowledged around the world with special events. In Vancouver, for example, the Pacific Hepatitis C Network and the Positive Living Society of British Columbia will be hosting a community forum entitled: Hepatitis C and HIV Co-Infection – Transmission to Treatment.

Community Forum: Hepatitis C and HIV Co-Infection – Transmission to Treatment

Hepatitis C and HIV Co-Infection – Transmission to Treatment is the focus of Positive Living BC’s community forum on July 28. This event is free and open to everyone, no RSVP is required. You are invited to drop in to learn about advances in hepatitis C care in Canada, and to meet new people and share your own experiences. Snacks and lunch will be provided. The event will run from 10:30 am to 12 pm.

“The forum will take place at the Carnegie Centre (401 Main St). Dr. Alexandra King, MD, FRCPC, Lu’ma Medical Centre and Suzan Krieger, Access and Assistance Coordinator at Positive Living BC will be presenting. The forum is produced in co-operation with the Pacific Hepatitis C Network.” (Positive Living BC, 2016)

Community Forum’s Details

Date: July 28th

Time: 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Where: Carnegie Centre, 401 Main Street, Vancouver

For more information, please contact Brandon or phone 604-893-2239.

All are Welcome!

World Hepatitis Day

“Did you know? July 28 is World Hepatitis Day. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) made World Hepatitis Day one of only 4 official disease-specific world health days, to be celebrated each year on the 28th of July. Millions of people across the world now take part in World Hepatitis Day, to raise awareness about viral hepatitis, and to call for access to treatment, better prevention programs and government action. The theme for World Hepatitis Day Canada 2016 is ‘Know Your Status? Get Tested – Learn Your Options’.” (Positive Living BC, 2016)

Please visit World Hepatitis Day Canada or World Hepatitis Day for more information about the global event. Please visit our blog post, 2016 World Hepatitis Day Events Around British Columbia, for information about World Hepatitis Day events taking place around BC.

Daklinza for historically difficult to treat patients

Daklinza (daclatasvir) for historically difficult to treat patientsMay 24, 2016 – Daklinza (daclatasvir), taken for 12 weeks (in combination with Sovaldi and with or without ribavirin), has been approved by Health Canada for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C (genotype 1, 2, or 3) and with HIV co-infection, advanced liver cirrhosis, or post-liver transplant hep C recurrence.

This approval is good news as due to potential drug interactions between hep C treatments and HIV treatments or anti-rejection drugs for post-transplant, patients who are co-infected or have had  liver transplants have been historically difficult to treat. This difficulty hasn’t been good news as, for example, approximately 20% of Canadians with HIV also have hep C (HCV). When patients have both infections, hep C progresses much faster than it does in those infected with just HCV–progresses much faster to the point where HCV related liver disease is the leading cause of death for those who are co-infected. (BMS Canada)

These new Health Canada approvals, or treatment indications, were based on data from the clinical trials ALLY-1 and ALLY-2.

Click here to read the news release by Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada.

Daklinza (daclatasvir) with Sovaldi (sofosbuvir)

Daklinza taken in combination with other hep C antivirals, such as Sovaldi, was approved for Canadian use in August 2015.

Daklinza with Sovaldi and with or without ribavirin is a treatment for those with chronic hep C genotype 1, 2, or 3, including those with cirrhosis, and now with HIV co-infection, advanced cirrhosis, or post-liver transplant hep C recurrence. It is an all-oral, short-course (12 or 24 weeks), interferon-free, possibly ribavirin-free, treatment.

“With this expanded label for Daklinza, we are proud to provide an option that helps bridge what has been a challenging treatment gap for these patients.” –Dr. Nawal Peacock, President and General Manager, Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada.

Holkira Pak approved to treat more patients

Holkira Pak approved to treat more patientsOn April 11, 2016, Health Canada approved Holkira Pak to treat patients who are HCV/HIV-1 co-infected and those with hep C (HCV) who have had liver transplants.

The efficacy and safety of Holkira Pak to treat patients with hep C genotype 1 co-infected with HIV-1 has been established. The efficacy and safety of Holkira Pak with ribavirin has also been proven when used to treat liver transplant recipients with normal hepatic function and a Metavir fibrosis score of ≤ 2, regardless of whether the virus is hepatitis C genotype 1a or 1b.

Holkira Pak

Holkira Pak is a treatment for patients with chronic genotype 1 hepatitis C without severe liver damage. It is an all-pill, short-course, interferon-free treatment that can be taken with or without ribavirin.

In Phase 3 clinical trials, Holkira Pak (with or without ribavirin) cured an overall 97% of those with genotype 1 hep C and was found to be well tolerated by patients. 98% of clinical trial participates completed treatment. In Phase 2 and 3 clinical trials, the overall rates of treatment discontinuation due to side effects were low (0.2%).

Holkira Pak for Patients HCV/HIV-1 Co-Infected

In the clinical trial Turquoise-I, 94% of patients who were HCV/HIV-1 co-infected were cured of hep C, achieved a sustained virologic response, with Holkira Pak and ribavirin.

Holkira Pak for Liver Transplant Recipients

Holkira Pak cured 97% of liver transplant recipients in clinical trial. Those clinical trial results and additional information about the trial can be found in The New England Journal of Medicine.

For more information about Holkira Pak, hep C treatments for those HCV/HIV co-infected, or for those who have had liver transplants, please visit PHCN’s Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project or email.

CROI 2016 Hep C (HCV) Highlights

CROI 2016 Hep C (HCV) HighlightsCROI 2016

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), an annual preeminent HIV research meeting, was held in Boston, Massachusetts, February 22-25, this year. CROI gathers scientists researching epidemiology and biology of human retroviruses and associated diseases to discuss their findings.

This blog post is a collection of hepatitis C (HCV) at CROI 2016 highlights and some 2016 journal articles about HCV/HIV coinfection and treatment.

Sampling of CROI 2016 Abstracts about HIV/HCV Coinfection

Hepatitis C Highlights at CROI 2016 according to HIVandHepatitis.com:

Hepatitis C Highlights at CROI 2016 by hepmag.com:

Hepatitis C Highlights at CROI 2016 according to AIDS.gov:

Recent Articles about HCV/HIV Coinfection and Treatment: