Tag Archives: European Association for the Study of the Liver

HCV / HIV Co-Infection Topics Presented at #EASLsp

HCV / HIV Co-Infection Topics Presented at #EASLspThe European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) / American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)’s two day special conference, entitled “New Perspectives in Hepatitis C Virus Infection – The Roadmap for Cure” (#EASLsp), was held last week in Paris, France. The conference has gathered experts to review and analysis current hepatitis C (HCV) treatment data, published and unpublished. This blog covers just some of what was presented about HCV/HIV co-infection.

Some HCV / HIV Co-Infection Topics Presented in Paris

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Summary: Due to the complex way liver disease develops, the higher risk of hep C and re-infection, and the risk for drug interactions with antiretrovirals, frequently not addressed in clinical trials, those with HCV/HIV co-infection still pose challenges.

Summary: HCV/HIV co-infection is prevalent in those who use opiates. However, little is known about the results of opiate replacement treatment (ORT) for those with hep C and those who are HCV/HIV co-infected who are in ORT. This study saw that HCV/HIV co-infected patients received more methadone when compared with patients without infections. No differences in methadone doses were found in those with hep C. It also showed that hep C doesn’t cause any difference in whether or not the opiate replacement treatment (ORT) will work long term.

Summary: This study looked at the effectiveness of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), a type of hep C treatment, in real life. It looked at interactions between HCV/HIV treatments and monitored liver fibrosis, transaminases, and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) changes while taking treatment. The study found that direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are effective and improve liver fibrosis, hepatic cytolysis, and AFP.

For more information about studies presented at the EASL / AASLD special conference in Paris last week, please find Part I of the conference’s blog series here and Part II here.

The Roadmap for Cure Conference in Paris (Part I)

The EASL / AASLD's conference in ParisThe European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) / American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)’s two day special conference, entitled “New Perspectives in Hepatitis C Virus Infection – The Roadmap for Cure, started today in Paris, France. The conference has gathered experts to review and analysis current hepatitis C treatment data, published and unpublished. Their focus will be on:

  • Epidemiology of hep C in different areas of the world
  • Virology and pathogenesis
  • Natural history of the disease and impact of the new treatments on the long term consequences of chronic hep C infection
  • Assessment of the disease
  • Therapy, with special emphasis on difficult-to-treat populations or unsolved issues
  • Eradication strategies (EASL 2016)

Some Hepatitis C Treatment Topics to be Presented in Paris (Part I)

Summary: This looked at clinical trial results for three Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) based treatments and possible reasons for relapse. It ruled out the idea that “…the role of a potential incorrect recognition, by the commonly used inverse dot blot genotyping method, of a chimera 2k/1b virus…” as a reason for relapse with sofosbuvir and ribavirin in genotype 2 infected patients. Because of this, it is believed that treatments in phase III studies will cure all patients with genotype 2 HCV after only 8 weeks of treatments.

Summary: Current clinical trial data has shown success in  curing in 3-4 weeks with DAA combos for “ultra-rapid responders”. As a result, it may be possible to individualize treatment times further in the future.

Summary: Treating post-transplant patients has become easier with the new treatments, but it still remains less than ideal because of three limitations. These limitations are: a lack of data looking at treatment without ribavirin (a drug hard to take by those with altered GFR and anemia); the increased chance of drug interactions; and lower SVR rates for patients with hep C genotype 3 virus and for those with liver cirrhosis.

Summary: Due to complex liver pathogenesis, higher risk of acute HCV infection and re-infection, and potential for drug interactions with antiretrovirals that are frequently not addressed in registration trials, those with HIV/HCV co-infection still pose challenges. These challenges will be looked at in this presentation.

Summary: This abstract outlines clinical results for those with hep C genotypes 4, 5, and 6. For example, the NEUTRINO trial with Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) plus PR for 12 weeks resulted in a cure rate of 96.5% for GT4 patients and 100% cure for patients with GT5 and GT6 hep C after 12 weeks. Another trial highlight examined Zepatier for GT4 (100%) with RBV added, and GT5 (75% with RBV, 25% without RBV) and GT6 patients (SVR12 80%).

A Quote from the Conference’s Abstracts

The sweetest quote read while reading through these conference abstracts was: “Recent studies from Europe suggested that geographical factors had an impact on possible lower rates of response at the time of genotype specific treatment.” (Alessandra Mangia) Could this mean that researchers may be passed an era of genotype specific treatment and if so, will patients soon be able to follow?

Lastly, this blog post will be continued tomorrow with more information about hep C treatment currently being discussed at the EASL / AASLD special conference in Paris.

The International Liver Congress 2016 Part I

The International Liver Congress 2016 Part IThe International Liver Congress 2016

The International Liver Congress 2016 (#ILC2016), the annual European Association for the Study of the Liver meeting, is taking place this week in Barcelona, Spain. This blog post is a collection of just some of the topics that have already been discussed at The International Liver Congress 2016.

Topics from The International Liver Congress’s Start

Summary: The all-oral combination of sofosbuvir/velpatasvir with GS-9857, a drug in clinical trials, has been found to be safe and effective on patients who have had treatments fail for them. With the treatment, 99% of trial subjects achieved SVR12.

Summary: A discussion about the potential risks and benefits of treating those with late-stage liver disease. Dr Carlos Fernández Carrillo, Liver Unit of Puerta de Hierro-Majadahonda University Hospital, Spain, stated that, “The results of our study clearly show that those patients suffering from very advanced liver disease may not obtain benefit from these treatments.”

Summary: The study shows that those with hep C who had been previously cured of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer, had a chance of the cancer returning during or after treating their hep C. Researchers say that more study is required.

Summary: Last year the Portuguese government approved treatment for all of their citizens with hep C. 96% of them experienced sustained virologic response.

Abstracts can be found on the ILC 2016 website.

Press Releases by Pharmaceutical Companies from Barcelona

The European Association for the Study of the Liver

Founded in 1966, the European Association for the Study of the Liver is the leading liver association in Europe. Their annual meetings bring together scientific and medical experts from a broad range of fields to discuss their research and findings.