Tag Archives: PHCN

The PHCN‘s News in Review Newsletter (06/12/16)

The PHCN‘s News in Review Newsletter (06/12/16)Welcome to the Pacific Hepatitis C Network (PHCN)‘s second Hepatitis C News in Review Newsletter. This is where we review all of the major current issues and events around hepatitis C and hep C treatments. It is an email that includes links to our recent blog posts—including links to blog posts about Public Health Agency of Canada funding.

HEALTH CANADA SUMMARY SAFETY REVIEW – DAAs – ASSESSING THE POTENTIAL RISK OF HEPATITIS B VIRUS REACTIVATION

Please click here for more information.

WHAT WOMEN WITH HEPATITIS C EXPERIENCE NEEDS TO BE IMPROVED NOW

“Although our research on the experience of diagnosis was undertaken prior to the present major advances of interferon-free HCV treatment, which have given new hope of speedy and less burdensome treatment, these new treatments alone will not solve the burden of HCV.” (Mitchell, et al. 2016)

Therefore, it is still critical to examine how women with hepatitis C are cared for and then strive to improve that care. The findings of a new study, published in a recent issue of the Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, are interesting and a good start. Click here to read more.

HEPATITIS C ADVOCACY HIGHLIGHTS

Recently the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) announced that community-based projects that lost funding in the October changes to the HIV and Hepatitis C Community Action Fund‘s Letter of Intent (LOI) funding process will now, on a case-by-case basis, have transitional project funding until March 31, 2018. Click here for more information.

On December 1st, World AIDS Day, the HIV and HCV communities stood together in solidarity with organizations who were denied funding going forward as part of the changes to the PHAC Community Action Fund LOI process. More information about the rally is here.

Daryl Luster was at the World AIDS Day rally and wrote and gave a speech entitled: We Have Not Abandoned the Principles or Communities We Serve, Neither Should PHAC.

In addition, November began with Daryl meeting with BC NDP MLA Shane Simpson. They spoke about the landscape of hepatitis C in BC, local testing shortfalls, and hep C treatments and cures. See a picture here.

HEP C HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE CANADIAN DRUG APPROVAL PIPELINE AND THE LIVER MEETING 2016

The Liver Meeting 2016, the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)‘s 67th annual meeting, was held last month. Exciting and important hep C clinical results were presented. Some of these highlights can be found in the following posts:

For more information about the topics in this newsletter, please click on the links, visit PHCN’s Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project, or email us.

MLA’s luncheon

sq_experiencesOn November 18th, the PHCN hosted Honourable Terry Lake, BC Minister of Health, and 15 other BC Government MLAs at a MLA’s luncheon in Victoria. Speeches were made about hepatitis C and the policy changes needed to ensure that more people in BC get tested, treated, and cured of hepatitis C.

Daryl Luster, PHCN Board President, described his experience with hepatitis C—beginning to feel ill, 3 years of tests and worsening symptoms, an ‘accidental’ hepatitis C diagnosis, and a fortunate clinical trial where Daryl, after a fairly debilitating round of new and old hep C treatments, cleared the virus. Daryl spoke of how he wanted to spare other hep C patients the experience of worsening symptoms and not being able to find help for far too long. He made a promise then to work hard to see changes that would make it easier for anyone with hepatitis C to get tested, treated, and cured.

Dr. Mel Krajden, Director of BC Hepatitis Services at the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), presented as well. Dr. Krajden spoke to the different groups of people with hep C—baby boomers, people who use injection drugs, immigrant populations, and aboriginal communities—and about how each group has specific needs. He said that while the Treatment as Prevention is a good approach for reaching and engaging people who are marginalized, other strategies are required. For instance, for baby boomers, he recommends a ‘Test, Triage, and Treat’ approach.

We spoke to the need for new treatments to be listed with PharmaCare with no unnecessary restrictions as soon as possible. We urged the government to seize the opportunity to be leaders in the fight to eradicate hepatitis C—a very real possibility.

Health Minister Lake spoke to the government’s commitment to addressing viral hepatitis and the ongoing negotiations with pharmaceutical companies for new drug prices. The Ministry of Health sees great value in the ‘Treatment as Prevention’ approach.

We hope that the government also sees that different populations have different needs and we want to be smart and strategic in how needs are met!

In addition, Daryl and Dr. Mel Krajden also met with political staff in Minister Lake’s office as well as with Ministry of Health staff in the Population and Public Health branch to discuss these same issues.

Stay tuned for more Hep C TIP Advocacy News!