Tag Archives: HIV

CROI 2017 by Lucinda K. Porter, RN

CROI 2017 by Lucinda K. Porter, RNLucinda K. Porter

This is a collection of blog posts written by Lucinda K. Porter, RN, a hepatitis C writer who attended this year’s Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI). The blog posts below highlight hepatitis C studies presented at the conference that stood out to her.

Please scroll down and click on the blog tittles that interest you.

Sampling of CROI 2017 Meeting Highlights Written by Lucinda K. Porter, RN

CROI 2017

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), an annual preeminent HIV research meeting, was held in Seattle, Washington, February 13-16 this year. CROI gathers scientists researching epidemiology and biology of human retroviruses and associated diseases to discuss their findings.

More information about the CROI and the studies that were presented there can also be found in our blog post CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part I.

“Creating a world free from hepatitis C one step at a time” -Lucinda Porter

CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part II

CROI 2017 Hep C (HCV) HighlightsCROI 2017

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), an annual preeminent HIV research meeting, was held in Seattle, Washington, February 13-16 this year. CROI gathers scientists researching epidemiology and biology of human retroviruses and associated diseases to discuss their findings.

This blog post is a collection of HIV/HCV highlights that were presented at CROI 2017. Please scroll down and click on the subjects that interest you.

More Interesting CROI 2017 Abstracts about HIV/HCV Coinfection

More information about The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), or these and other studies can be found in our blog post CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part I or on the conference’s website.

CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part I

CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part ICROI 2017

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), an annual preeminent HIV research meeting, was held in Seattle, Washington, February 13-16 this year. CROI gathers scientists researching epidemiology and biology of human retroviruses and associated diseases to discuss their findings.

This blog post is a collection of HIV/HCV highlights that were presented. Please scroll down and click on the subjects that interest you.

Interesting Meeting Abstracts about HIV/HCV Coinfection

More information about The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), or these and other studies can be found in our blog post CROI 2017 Hep C Highlights Part II or on the conference’s website.

HCV / HIV Co-Infection Topics Presented at #EASLsp

HCV / HIV Co-Infection Topics Presented at #EASLspThe European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) / American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)’s two day special conference, entitled “New Perspectives in Hepatitis C Virus Infection – The Roadmap for Cure” (#EASLsp), was held last week in Paris, France. The conference has gathered experts to review and analysis current hepatitis C (HCV) treatment data, published and unpublished. This blog covers just some of what was presented about HCV/HIV co-infection.

Some HCV / HIV Co-Infection Topics Presented in Paris

The links below may need to be clicked twice or waited for in order to work.

Summary: Due to the complex way liver disease develops, the higher risk of hep C and re-infection, and the risk for drug interactions with antiretrovirals, frequently not addressed in clinical trials, those with HCV/HIV co-infection still pose challenges.

Summary: HCV/HIV co-infection is prevalent in those who use opiates. However, little is known about the results of opiate replacement treatment (ORT) for those with hep C and those who are HCV/HIV co-infected who are in ORT. This study saw that HCV/HIV co-infected patients received more methadone when compared with patients without infections. No differences in methadone doses were found in those with hep C. It also showed that hep C doesn’t cause any difference in whether or not the opiate replacement treatment (ORT) will work long term.

Summary: This study looked at the effectiveness of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), a type of hep C treatment, in real life. It looked at interactions between HCV/HIV treatments and monitored liver fibrosis, transaminases, and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) changes while taking treatment. The study found that direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are effective and improve liver fibrosis, hepatic cytolysis, and AFP.

For more information about studies presented at the EASL / AASLD special conference in Paris last week, please find Part I of the conference’s blog series here and Part II here.

HCV and HIV Co-Infection – Transmission to Treatment Forum

HCV and HIV Co-Infection - Transmission to Treatment Forum2016 World Hepatitis Day is fast approaching. On July 28th, it will be celebrated and acknowledged around the world with special events. In Vancouver, for example, the Pacific Hepatitis C Network and the Positive Living Society of British Columbia will be hosting a community forum entitled: Hepatitis C and HIV Co-Infection – Transmission to Treatment.

Community Forum: Hepatitis C and HIV Co-Infection – Transmission to Treatment

Hepatitis C and HIV Co-Infection – Transmission to Treatment is the focus of Positive Living BC’s community forum on July 28. This event is free and open to everyone, no RSVP is required. You are invited to drop in to learn about advances in hepatitis C care in Canada, and to meet new people and share your own experiences. Snacks and lunch will be provided. The event will run from 10:30 am to 12 pm.

“The forum will take place at the Carnegie Centre (401 Main St). Dr. Alexandra King, MD, FRCPC, Lu’ma Medical Centre and Suzan Krieger, Access and Assistance Coordinator at Positive Living BC will be presenting. The forum is produced in co-operation with the Pacific Hepatitis C Network.” (Positive Living BC, 2016)

Community Forum’s Details

Date: July 28th

Time: 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Where: Carnegie Centre, 401 Main Street, Vancouver

For more information, please contact Brandon or phone 604-893-2239.

All are Welcome!

World Hepatitis Day

“Did you know? July 28 is World Hepatitis Day. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) made World Hepatitis Day one of only 4 official disease-specific world health days, to be celebrated each year on the 28th of July. Millions of people across the world now take part in World Hepatitis Day, to raise awareness about viral hepatitis, and to call for access to treatment, better prevention programs and government action. The theme for World Hepatitis Day Canada 2016 is ‘Know Your Status? Get Tested – Learn Your Options’.” (Positive Living BC, 2016)

Please visit World Hepatitis Day Canada or World Hepatitis Day for more information about the global event. Please visit our blog post, 2016 World Hepatitis Day Events Around British Columbia, for information about World Hepatitis Day events taking place around BC.

Forum Making it work: From Planning to Practice

Making it work: From Planning to PracticeThis fall CATIE hosted a national forum in Toronto with the theme Making it work: From Planning to Practice. The forum was designed as a place to dialogue and learn about the front line implications of the newest research and approaches in HIV and HCV prevention, testing, treatment, and care and support. It was attended by 350 people, including those with HIV and/or with or experience with HCV.

Along with other movers and shakers in their fields of expertise, speakers at the forum included such hep C and HIV experts as:

Their speeches and presentation slides can be found online with the links provided above.

One of the reasons we decided to highlight this forum is that the presentations do a really good job at clearly expressing the importance of hepatitis C advocacy and the importance of better care, prevention, and treatment. For example, a slide that stood out was part of Dr. Jordan Feld’s speech illustrating the difference between traditional HIV lobbies and HCV lobbies (presentation time 14:52). It is a possible exaggeration, but one that stood out and brought the point home that more can be done, more needs to be done.

Making it work: From Planning to Practice
The above is a slide that stood out. It was part of Dr. Jordan Feld’s speech and was used to illustrate the difference between traditional HIV and HCV/hep C lobbies (presentation time 14:52). It is a possible exaggeration, but it successfully illustrated the point Feld was trying to make. Click on the presentation’s link to see Feld’s whole presentation.