Tag Archives: BC PharmaCare

Our Top 2016 Hepatitis C Treatment Posts as Clicked by You

Our top 2016 hepatitis C treatment posts as clicked by you are as follows:

Our Top 2016 Hepatitis C Treatment Posts as Clicked by YouThe Top 5 Blog Posts Read in 2016

The Top 5 Facebook Posts that Received the Most Reactions/Clicks in 2016

The Subjects of the Top 5 Tweets Posted in 2016

The Top Email Subjects Received by the Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project in 2016

  • I am thinking about starting treatment and am wondering if you can answer the following questions?
  • I am thinking about starting treatment and am wondering about BC PharmaCare’s liver fibrosis stage F2 or greater treatment eligibility cut off.

May 2017 be a year just as full of exciting hep C headlines and developments as 2016 was. Happy New Year from all of us at the Pacific Hepatitis C Network!

Possible Softening of Liver Fibrosis Stage F1> Treatment Requirement

Possible Softening of Liver Fibrosis Stage F1> Treatment RequirementThe Pacific Hepatitis C Network has received reports that at least one Canadian assistance program offered by a pharmaceutical company is working with patients, on a case-by-case basis, to treat those with liver fibrosis stage F1. The status quo, requiring a liver fibrosis stage F2 or higher to access hep C treatment, in Canada may be changing and the Pacific Hepatitis C Network applauds this possible change.

If you have hepatitis C and are interested in treatment, please talk to your healthcare provider about it and keep regular tabs on your liver’s health.

Liver Fibrosis

Liver fibrosis is the early stage of liver scarring. It happens when a liver tries to heal itself and in the process creates scar tissue that can’t do the work of normal liver cells. Fibrosis doesn’t cause symptoms but can lead to portal hypertension or liver cirrhosis. A liver biopsy is used to diagnosis it. Fibrosis can be stopped and some of the changes reversed if the underlying condition is treated.

Liver Fibrosis Stages

There are five stages of liver fibrosis, stage 0 to stage 4 (stage F1-F4). Stage 0 means a liver is normal and doesn’t have fibrosis. Stage 4 is liver cirrhosis. Currently, BC PharmaCare requires a patient to have liver fibrosis stage 2 or higher in order to possibly qualify for hep C treatment coverage. At stage 2, one may still not know that their liver is damaged and may not experience liver failure symptoms such as yellow skin or eyes or abdominal pain.

More information about liver fibrosis and liver cirrhosis can be found in Understanding Cirrhosis of the Liver: First steps for the newly diagnosed, an easy-to-read resource that was put together by CATIE and the Canadian Association of Hepatology Nurses.

Sunvepra, Technivie, Zepatier, and Drug Approval Negotiations

Sunvepra, Technivie, Zepatier, and drug approval negotiationsWhile the last step of the drug development and approval process in Canada and BC, the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance (pCPA) negotiations, is taking place for three new hepatitis C treatments (SunvepraTechnivie,  and Zepatier), there is still a larger discussion going on that is “…exploring the need for a national formulary…”. (CMAJ, May 16, 2016)^

A formulary is a health insurance provider’s official list of pharmaceutical drugs that they have approved for coverage. (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

The Pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance (pCPA) and the Current System of Individual Provincial / Territorial Drug Formularies

Steps Towards Listing a Treatment

Currently, within the Canadian drug approval process, Health Canada first evaluates a drug’s safety, effectiveness, and how it’s made.

After this, a Common Drug Review (CDR) by the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) then assesses the drug’s clinical and cost-effectiveness as it compares to other treatments.

Thirdly, according to the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance (pCPA)’s website, once a CDR is complete, individual provinces/territories may then negotiate with the manufacturer without pCPA or, if the pCPA steps in after deciding that joint pan-Canadian negotiations for the drug will occur, provinces/territories may negotiate collectively.* This happens about 80% of the time. (CMAJ, May 16, 2016)

A province/territory then assumes the lead in the pCPA negotiations, contacts the manufacturer, and starts negotiations. If an agreement about treatment prices is reached, the lead province, the manufacturer, and the other provinces/territories negotiating sign a Letter of Intent. The Letter of Intent ends the pCPA’s involvement in the drug’s approval process.

After a Letter of Intent is signed, the participating jurisdictions will work with the manufacturer on their individual Product Listing Agreement (PLA), or work on a translation of the terms agreed to in the Letter of Intent. This translation is not a second negotiation. After this, the treatment is then listed.

When Negotiations Fail to Reach an Agreement

However, if negotiations are closed without reaching an agreement, as recently happened with Daklinza (daclatasvir), a treatment for those infected with hep C genotype 1, 2, or 3, provinces/territories involved in the pCPA negotiations can not restart negotiations with the manufacturer on their own.

Once pCPA negotiations are closed, future requests by the provinces/territories for re-consideration start with the treatment’s file being resubmitted to pCPA for further review through their office. In the future, if a manufacture believes that it is “able to provide the value needed by the jurisdictions”**, the manufacturer can also submit an unsolicited offer to the pCPA office and possibly restart negotiations that way. When this happens, provinces/territories are not bound to re-enter pCPA negotiations for the treatment.**

The Current Discussion about Changing the System of Provincial / Territorial Drug Formularies to a National Formulary

Currently, there is talk about changing the system of provincial/territorial drug formularies into a more national pharmacare system. The below are recent articles and videos about this discussion:

*The pCPA also negotiates for military and RCMP employees, First Nations and Inuit people. It is estimated that the pCPA has saved $490 million since 2010. (CMAJ, May 16, 2016)

**The source of this information was a requested email from the Pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance and the links within this post.

^Some of this post was originally published in May 2016. As there are now three hepatitis C treatments being examined by pCPA, instead of two, we believed that the subject matter was important and current enough to publish it again.

Treatments Covered by BC PharmaCare for Hep C Genotypes 2-6

Pan-Genotypic Hepatitis C Treatments: The BasicsPharmaCare Covered Treatments for Hep C Genotypes 2 – 6

Pegylated Interferon with Ribavirin (PR)* Ribavirin Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) with ribavirin**
Drug Class Nucleoside Analog Nucleotide NS5B Polymerase Inhibitor
Targeted Genotypes (GT) 2 – 6 2, 3 2, 3
Approximate SVR GT 2: < 80% See Sovadi (sofosbuvir) with ribavirin

The amount of daily pills required depends on one’s weight. Typically, the dose is 1,000 mg/day for persons less than 165 lbs. (75 kg.) and 1,200 mg/day for those 165 lbs. (75 kg.) or greater.

GT 2: 85 – 95%
GT 4: < 65%
GT 3, 5, 6: <40% GT 3: 75 – 85%
PR Required This is PR No
Daily Pills ribavirin + weekly pegylated interferon (PI) 1 + ribavirin
Weeks of Treatment
14 or 24 Genotype 2: 12
Genotype 3: 24
Possible Side Effects (Taking treatment with ribavirin can increase the type, frequency, and intensity of side effects)
  • Can’t Sleep
  • Depression / mood change
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Dry mouth
  • Fatigue / weakness
  • Fever
  • Flulike / Cold like symptoms
  • Hair loss
  • Headache
  • Low platelets (thrombocytopenia)
  • Low white cells (neutropenia)
  • Muscle / joint / back aches
  • Nausea
  • Stomach issues
  • Tiredness
  • Anemia, hemolytic (low red cells)
  • Dizziness / lightheadedness
  • Fatigue
  • Increased heart rate
  • Insomnia
  • Itchy / dry skin
  • Loss of appetite
  • Mood issues (anxiety, depression, irritability, moodiness)
  • Nausea
  • Shortness of breath
  • Taste changes
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Upset stomach (dyspepsia)
  • Weakness
  • Headache
  • Tiredness
Drug Interactions (Please see online product monographs for more information.) Do not take ribavirin if you are taking didanosine or zidovudine. Tell your doctor if you are taking azathioprine. Ribavirin is a drug that may harm fetuses. Tell your doctor if you may be or may become pregnant. Sovaldi can not be taken by those:

  • With bradycardia
  • Taking amiodarone

It may interact with drugs and herbs that are metabolized in the liver and intestines such as St. John’s wort.

BC’s PharmaCare Coverage Requirements Genotype 2: Treatment naive patients who can’t take interferon for medical reasons or have already tried PR
Genotype 3: Patients who have never tried treatment AND who can’t take interferon for medical reasons OR have already tried PR
  • Lab-confirmed hepatitis C and the right genotypes for the treatment
  • Detectable levels of hep C in the last 6 months
  • A liver fibrosis stage F2 or greater
  • A Special Authority request completed by a specialist or experienced physician
  • NOT currently treated with another hep C treatment/hep C antiviral agent
Special PharmaCare Notes In exceptional cases, requests that do not meet the criteria above may receive special consideration for coverage if the physician provides additional documentation of disease progression and/or for other patient-specific considerations. The Hepatitis Drug Benefit Adjudication Advisory Committee reviews exceptional case submissions.
Additional PharmaCare Notes Ribavirin and Sovadi (sofosbuvir) do not come together. Re-treatment requests will not be considered. PharmaCare covered for HIV/HCV coinfection if above criteria is met
Patient Assistance Program Contact Information PEGAssist Patient Support Program 1-877-734-2797 Ibavyr Patient Support Program 1-844-602-6858 Gilead’s Momentum Patient Assistance Program 1-855-447-7977
*PR stands for pegylated interferon with ribavirin. It may be combined with other drugs for the treatment of hep C genotype 1 or it may be prescribed alone for hep C genotypes 2 – 6.**Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) and pegylated interferon with ribavirin is approved for use in Canada to treat hep C genotype 4 but isn’t covered by BC’s PharmaCare.

Further Treatment Links and Resources about Treatment for Hep C Genotypes 2-6

Treatment Coverage Across Canada
Treatment coverage across Canada is decided upon by each province and territory. This means that not only can treatments vary, and be compared to each other, but treatment coverage may vary from location to location as well. This page is a quick summary of what hepatitis C treatments are covered, in some form or another, by the different provinces and territories across Canada. (Canadian)

Hepatitis C Treatment OPTIONS: Basic Information for Patients by Hepatitis Education Canada
This interactive tool will provide you with personal hepatitis C treatment recommendations that can be printed for reference or to taken your provider. (Canadian)

PharmaCare Covered Treatments for Hep C Genotypes 2 - 6

Treatments Covered by BC PharmaCare for Hep C Genotypes 1a/1b

Treatments Covered by BC PharmaCare for Hep C Genotypes 1a/1bComparing Treatments Covered by BC PharmaCare for Hep C Genotypes 1a/1b

Galexos (simeprevir) with Pegylated Interferon with Ribavirin (PR) Harvoni (ledipasvir and sofosbuvir) Holkira Pak (ombitasvir / paritaprevir / ritonavir + dasabuvir) Holkira Pak (ombitasvir / paritaprevir / ritonavir + dasabuvir) with Ribavirin Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) with PR
Drug Class NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor NS5A Inhibitor and Nucleotide NS5B Polymerase Inhibitor NS5A Inhibitor / NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor / Non-Nucleoside NS5B Polymerase Inhibitor +/- Nucleoside Analog Nucleotide NS5B Polymerase Inhibitor
Targeted Genotypes (GT) 1a/b without Q80K variant 1a/b 1b 1a 1a/b
Approximate SVR (Approx Rate of “Cure”) 77 – 87% 93 – 99% 90 – 100% 90 – 100% 90 – 95%
PR Required** Yes No No No Yes
Daily Pills 3 + weekly pegylated interferon (PI) 1 4 4 + ribavirin pills 3 + weekly pegylated interferon (PI)
Weeks of Treatment (Click for Details) 12 + 12 to 36 of PR 8, 12 or 24 12 24 12 or 24
Possible Side Effects (Taking treatment with ribavirin can increase the type, frequency, and intensity of side effects)
  • Constipation
  • Increased bilirubin levels in one’s blood
  • Sensitivity to sunlight
  • Skin rash

Plus side effects from PR

  • Diarrhea
  • Insomnia
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Tiredness
  • Diarrhea
  • Headache
  • Insomnia
  • Itchiness
  • Nausea
  • Tiredness
  • Diarrhea
  • Headache
  • Insomnia
  • Itchiness
  • Nausea
  • Tiredness

Plus side effects from ribavirin

 

  • Headache
  • Insomnia
  • Low red blood cell count
  • Nausea
  • Tiredness

Plus side effects from PR

Drug Warnings (Please see online product monographs for more information.) Galexos should not be taken by those with moderate to severe liver impairment (Child-Pughs B and C). Harvoni can not be taken by those:

  • With bradycardia
  • Taking amiodarone
Holkira Pak should not be taken by those with moderate to severe liver impairment (Child-Pughs B and C).

Holkira Pak should not be taken with the following:

  • Ethinyl estradiol-containing medicines (such as some birth control products);
  • Drugs that are sensitive cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A substrates and for which elevated plasma concentrations are associated with serious adverse reactions;
  • Strong CYP2C8 inhibitors and inducers;
  • Moderate or strong inducers of CYP3A
Sovaldi can not be taken by those:

  • With bradycardia
  • Taking amiodarone
General Hep C Treatment Usage Warning Do not take treatments while taking recreational drugs or over-the-counter drugs, such as St. John’s wort, without first talking with your healthcare provider as they may interact with each other. Tell your doctor if you may be or may become pregnant. The safety and efficacy of most of these treatments in children less than 18 years of age has not been established.
BC’s PharmaCare Coverage Requirements (All of the following requirements DO NOT have to be met.)

OR

  • Treatment naive patients with or without cirrhosis

OR

  • Treatment experienced patients with or without cirrhosis

 

  • Treatment naive patients with or without cirrhosis

OR

  • Treatment experienced patients with or without cirrhosis
  • Treatment naive or experienced patients with or without cirrhosis

OR

  • Treatment experienced with cirrhosis and who have relapsed or had a partial response to PR

OR

  • Treatment experienced with cirrhosis and who have had a previous null response to PR
  • Treatment naive patients with or without cirrhosis
BC’s PharmaCare Coverage Requirements (All of the following requirements MUST be met.)
  • Lab-confirmed hepatitis C and the right genotypes for the treatment. If a patient has genotype 1 but had their genotype subtype diagnosis prior to May 1, 2012, they require a new genotyping test. HCV genotyping must be repeated for treatment-experienced patients.
  • Detectable levels of hep C in the last 6 months
  • A liver fibrosis stage F2 or greater
  • A Special Authority request completed by a specialist or physician experienced with treating hep C
  • NOT currently treated with another hep C treatment/hep C antiviral agent
Additional Treatment Specific Requirements for BC’s PharmaCare Coverage Doesn’t treat hep C genotype 1a with Q80K variant. The following patients are not eligible for coverage:

  • Patients previously treated with a NS3/4A protease inhibitor
  • Patient currently being treated with NS5A/NS5B inhibitor
See Length of Treatment table for more information. The following patients are not eligible for coverage:

  • Patients who have received previous NS3/4A protease inhibitors
  • Patients who have received previous sofosbuvir-based regimens including Harvoni
Special PharmaCare Notes In exceptional cases, requests that do not meet the criteria above may receive special consideration for coverage if the physician provides additional documentation of disease progression and/or for other patient-specific considerations. The Hepatitis Drug Benefit Adjudication Advisory Committee reviews exceptional case submissions.
Additional PharmaCare Notes Preferred options over pegylated interferon-based treatments. PharmaCare covered for HIV/HCV coinfection if above criteria is met. PharmaCare covered for HIV/HCV coinfection if above criteria is met
Patient Assistance Program Contact Information Galexos: Bioadvance Program 1-855-512- 3740 Momentum Patient Assistance Program 1-855-447- 7977 AbbVie Care 1-844-471-2273 Momentum Patient Assistance Program 1-855-447- 7977
*PR stands for pegylated interferon with ribavirin. It may be combined with other drugs for the treatment of hep C genotype 1 or it may be prescribed alone for hep C genotypes 2 – 6.

Further Treatment Links and Resources

Hepatitis C Treatment OPTIONS: Basic Information for Patients by Hepatitis Education Canada
This interactive tool will provide you with personal hepatitis C treatment recommendations that can be printed for reference or to taken your provider. (Canadian)

Comparing Treatments Covered by BC PharmaCare for Hep C Genotype 1a/b

Have you been treated for hepatitis C? If so, your input is requested.

Have you been treated for hepatitis C? If so, your input is requested.If you have been treated for hepatitis C, please click here and answer a few very quick and easy questions about your treatment experience.

This survey will close September 9th, 2016.

Epclusa (generic name sofosbuvir / velpatasvir) is being considered for BC PharmaCare coverage. One of the questions BC PharmaCare asks patient groups is:

“What drugs or other treatments have the patients in your group used, or are currently using, for the condition or disease for which this drug is used? Please list all of the treatments used and tell us about the experience of the patients in your group with each treatment.”

In hopes of answering this question well, the Pacific Hepatitis C Network has put together a very quick and easy survey for those of you who have taken treatment for hepatitis C, any treatment for hep C. Please consider completing our survey.

Please Note: Survey responses are anonymous (we don’t know your name or other information about you). The information gathered will be used as part of a patient group input report for BC PharmaCare. By completing the survey you accept that the Pacific Hepatitis C Network can use the information gathered by it in our patient group input report for BC PharmaCare.

Please email the Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project with any comments or concerns you have about Epclusa, the drug approval process, or about this survey.

Treatments in the Final Steps of the Canadian Drug Approval Pipeline

In the Final Steps of the Canadian Drug Approval PipelineThere are a couple of hepatitis C treatments making their way through the final steps of the Canadian drug approval pipeline. The following table was created to highlight these treatments and highlight the ways that you may be able to include your voice in their approval process.

Hepatitis C Treatments in the Final Steps of the Canadian Drug Approval Pipeline

Sunvepra (asunaprevir) + Daklinza (daclatasvir) +/- Pegylated Interferon with Ribavirin (PR) Technivie (ombitasvir, paritaprevir, ritonavir) +/- Ribavirin (RBV) Epclusa (sofosbuvir / velpatasvir +/- RBV Zepatier (elbasvir / grazoprevir) +/- RBV Zepatier (elbasvir / grazoprevir) + Sovaldi (sofosbuvir)
Treatment Drug Classes NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor, NS5A Inhibitor NS5A Inhibitor, NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor, and Ritonavir, a booster for paritaprevir Nucleotide NS5B Polymerase Inhibitor, NS5A Inhibitor NS5A Inhibitor, NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor NS5A Inhibitor, NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor, Nucleotide NS5B Polymerase Inhibitor
Step Within Canadian Drug Approval Pipeline Step 5 – Provincial Review
Currently Seeking Patient / Caretaker Input Has already been collected Has already been collected Has already been collected Has already been collected Has already been collected
Genotype (GT) Health Canada has Approved it for 1, 4 4 1 – 6 1, 4 3
Under BC PharmaCare Review for Genotype 1, 4 4 1 – 6 1, 4 3
Approximate SVR (Approx Rate of Cure) 93 – 100% 90% without RBV, 100% with RBV 94 – 100% 93 – 100% 91 – 100%
May Require PR* Yes No
May Not Require PR or RBV
Yes
Daily Pills 3 +/- PR 1 +/- twice daily RBV 1 +/- twice daily RBV 1 +/- twice daily RBV 2 once daily
Possible Weeks of Treatment 24 12 8, 12, or 24 8, 12, or 16 12
Most Common Side Effects** (Ribavirin can affect side effects)
  • Headache
  • Tiredness (fatigue)
  • Headache
  • Insomnia
  • Nausea
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness (asthenia)
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Tiredness (fatigue)
  • Anemia
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Tiredness (fatigue)
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Tiredness (fatigue)
Drug Warnings (Healthcare providers, patient assistance programs, and/or online product monographs, links below, have more information) Sunvepra is not for patients with moderate to severe liver impairment (Child-Pughs B and C). Do not take Sunvepra without combining it with other hep C treatments. Please see Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada’s Sunvepra information page for more information.

Technivie is not for patients with moderate to severe liver impairment (Child-Pughs B and C). Technivie should not be taken while taking: ethinyl estradiol-containing medicines, drugs that are sensitive cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A substrates and for which elevated plasma concentrations are associated with serious adverse reactions, strong CYP2C8 inhibitors and inducers, moderate or strong inducers of CYP3A.

Patients taking amiodarone should not take Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) in any combination.

Zepatier is not for patients with moderate to severe liver impairment (Child-Pughs B and C). Zepatier is contraindicated with organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B (OATP1B) inhibitors, strong inducers of cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A), and efavirenz.

Zepatier is not for patients with moderate to severe liver impairment (Child-Pughs B and C). Zepatier is contraindicated with organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B (OATP1B) inhibitors, strong inducers of cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A), and efavirenz.

Patients taking amiodarone should not take Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) in any combination.

General Hep C Treatment Usage Warning Do not take treatments while taking recreational drugs or over-the-counter drugs, such as St. John’s wort, without first talking with your healthcare provider as they may interact with each other. If you have any side effects not listed here, contact your healthcare provider. Tell your healthcare provider if you may be or may become pregnant. The safety and efficacy of most of these treatments in children less than 18 years of age has not been established.
Patient Assistance Program Contact Information Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada’s CLAIRE Program 1-844-HCV-2559 AbbVie Care 1-844-471-2273
Gilead’s Momentum Patient Assistance Program 1-855-447- 7977 Merck Care Program 1-866-872-5773
Information by Health Canada Sunvepra Technivie Epclusa Zepatier
Information about HCV / HIV Co-infection Sunvepra (by Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada) Technivie (by CATIE)

Epclusa (by hepmag)

Zepatier (by CATIE)
*PR stands for pegylated interferon with ribavirin. It may be combined with other drugs for the treatment of hep C. RBV stands for ribavirin. **If patients experience treatment side effects, they are usually not severe enough to stop treatment.

Canadian drug approval pipeline and treatment information was gathered last week from Health Canada’s Drug and Health Products sheets, BC PharmaCare Drug Information sheets, CATIE, hepmag, product monographs, and the Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project.

Epclusa is under review. Send a message to BC PharmaCare.

Epclusa is under review. Send a message to BC PharmaCare.BC PharmaCare Review Questionnaires for Epclusa (Once on the page, scroll down until you see a colourful table. Links to questionnaires for Epclusa input are at the very bottom of the page/colourful table.)

Epclusa (generic name sofosbuvir / velpatasvir) is being considered for BC PharmaCare coverage. As part of this process, hep C patients, caregivers, and patient groups in BC have the opportunity to share their opinions and perspectives about hepatitis C treatments and Epclusa with the decision makers.

If you are interested in grabbing this opportunity, the link above will take you to the questionnaires. The above link will also take you to BC PharmaCare’s Epclusa Information sheet and to information about BC PharmaCare’s approval process.

The questionnaires will ONLY remain open until Wednesday, September 21, AT MIDNIGHT

Adding Your Voice to the BC PharmaCare Coverage Review for Epclusa

If you answer yes to any of the following questions, you are encouraged to give your input:

Epclusa

Epclusa is the first pan-genotypic hepatitis C treatment* to be approved for use in Canada against all six hep C virus types. It is a short-course (12 weeks), interferon-free, hepatitis C treatment that can be prescribed with or without ribavirin. It is one pill taken once a day. With or without ribavirin, it cured 83-98% of patients in clinical trials, and cured 94% of those with moderate to severe liver cirrhosis.

The Importance of Epclusa

Epclusa, the first hep C pan-genotypic treatment, is important as it has the power to make hep C treatment much easier than it is now. As Dr. Jordan Feld, a liver specialist at Toronto Western Hospital, explained, a treatment that can be used for every virus type “…eliminates the need for [virus type/genotype] testing, which often delayed treatment and can be difficult to access for those living in rural or remote regions of the country….” (Ubelacker, The Canadian Press)

Also, Epclusa is the first treatment for patients with a hep C genotype 2 or 3 infection that doesn’t need ribavirin to achieve best treatment results.

More Information about Epclusa

For even more information, please contact BC PharmaCare’s Your Voice or the Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project.

Take the time to voice your opinion and help advocate for a better tomorrow!

*A pan-genotypic treatment is a treatment able to cure all six of the hep C virus types with high success rates against all six.

Is Epclusa soon-to-be considered for BC PharmaCare coverage?

Epclusa soon-to-be considered for BC PharmaCare coverage?YES. The Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project just received an advance notification from BC’s Ministry of Health that the hepatitis C treatment Epclusa (generic name sofosbuvir / velpatasvir) will soon be considered for BC PharmaCare coverage.

Wednesday August 24, 2016 to MIDNIGHT ON Wednesday September 21, 2016 is tentatively when input will be sought.

Submitting Input to BC PharmaCare about Hepatitis C Treatments and Epclusa

The BC PharmaCare approval process seeks input from patients and caregivers or loved ones of those who have or have had hepatitis C. If you are a BC resident and answer YES to any of the following questions, you can complete a questionnaire and send BC PharmaCare your input into whether or not they should cover Epclusa:

  1. Do you have hep C?
  2. Are you a caregiver to someone who has hep C?
  3. Does your patient group represent patients who have hep C AND have you registered with PharmaCare to give input? (Learn more about registering your organization).

Please note that PharmaCare’s questionnaire for Epclusa input wont tentatively be available for another two weeks. The Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project will send the questionnaire’s link out when BC PharmaCare makes it available.

Epclusa

Epclusa is the first pan-genotypic hepatitis C treatment to be approved for use in Canada against all six hep C virus types. A pan-genotypic treatment is a treatment able to cure all six of the hep C virus types with high success rates against all six.

More Information about Epclusa

For more information, please contact Your Voice or the Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project.

Your Voice Requested for Sunvepra’s BC PharmaCare Review

Input Requested for SUNVEPRA's BC PharmaCare ReviewSunvepra’s BC PharmaCare Review Questionnaires (Once on the page, scroll down until you see a colourful table.)

Sunvepra (asunaprevir) is being considered for BC PharmaCare coverage. As part of this process, BC patients, caregivers, and patient groups have the opportunity to become a part of this drug review and share their opinions and perspectives with the decision makers.

If you are interested in grabbing this opportunity to voice your opinions, the link above will take you to the questionnaires. The link will also take you to BC PharmaCare’s Drug Information sheet and to information about BC PharmaCare’s approval process.

The questionnaires will ONLY remain open until MIDNIGHT ON Wednesday June 15, 2016.

Adding Your Voice to the BC PharmaCare Coverage Review for Sunvepra

If you answer yes to any of the following questions, you can give your input:

Sunvepra (asunaprevir)

Sunvepra (asunaprevir) is prescribed in combination with other treatments/direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for patients with chronic hepatitis C genotypes 1 or 4 and compensated liver disease, including cirrhosis.

Sunvepra in combination with Daklinza, peginterferon, and ribavirin, was tested on those with hep C genotype 1 or 4 who were prior non-responders (patients who tried treatment but it failed to achieve SVR/’cure’) and succeeded with great results. High SVR12 rates were achieved with genotype 1 (93.2%) and genotype 4 (100%) patients. (Health Canada)

Links to Additional Information about Sunvepra

For more information, please contact BC PharmaCare’s Your Voice or the Hepatitis C Treatment Information Project.

Take the time to voice your opinion and help advocate for a better tomorrow!