The 5th International Symposium on Hepatitis Care in Substance Users 2

Hepatitis Care in Substance UsersThe 5th International Symposium on Hepatitis Care in Substance Users (#INHSU2016) began in Oslo, Norway, today and will run until Friday. This international conference is the biggest symposium of its kind that focuses on the management of hepatitis among substance users. It is organized by the International Network for Hepatitis in Substance Users (INHSU) and attracts health professionals, researchers, community organizations, substance users, and policy makers yearly. This year, the international symposium’s focus is on epidemiology and public health, treatment and care, and access to care. The following blog post highlights just some of the information that will be presented.

Hepatitis C Treatment Topics Presented at the 5th International Symposium on Hepatitis Care in Substance Users (Part 2)

Summary: This study aimed to provide more information about reinfection rates after successfully completing hep C (HCV) treatment (elbasvir, grazoprevir, and OAT). The study concluded that “follow-up is required to determine the natural course of HCV reinfection in the setting of interferon-free HCV treatment and the impact of viral persistence following reinfection on long-term response rates in this population.” (Dalgard)

Summary: This study demonstrates that outreach screening and hep C treatment within a Drug Treatment Unit is feasible and effective. It also saves money over time.

Summary: This study demonstrates that People Who Inject Drugs (PWID) can successfully complete treatment while continuing to use drugs.

Summary: This study, and the one below it, demonstrates the importance of care and support for those who have taken hep C treatment and were cured. The study suggests that support shouldn’t end with a hep C virus cure.

Summary: This study, and the one listed above, demonstrates the importance of care and support for those who have taken hep C treatment and were cured. The study suggests that support shouldn’t end with a hep C virus cure.

Summary: Yes, however, access to treatment that can cure patients, even hard to treat patients, must increase. The study assessed 509 patients. Fifty-nine of these patients were “…assessed as non-treatable. Main reasons being instability and lost to follow up.” (Ovrehus)

Summary: There are only  a few trials that look at how well patients are able to take their hep C treatment correctly. This trial is one of them.  It enrolled 59 trial participants with different degrees of drug use and found that “…despite high rates of substance use, a community-based model of HCV treatment can support positive HCV treatment outcomes.” (Mason)

Additional information about the abstracts listed above or other abstracts that were part of the 5th International Symposium on Hepatitis Care in Substance Users can be found in the symposium’s programme or in part 1 of this blog post.